My MBA Word Map. And some ‘Design’ Thoughts.

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As I research further and further into my future career aspirations and possibilities, I’ve realised how important the element of ‘design’ is to me. As a teenager, I attended a visual arts conservatory: I spent hours animating by hand, arguing over fonts, and painting oil landscapes. More than merely a hobby, art has impacted the way I understand the world. I’m a visual and tactile person who still needs to draw diagrams, flowcharts, and word maps to process complex concepts. As above, I still spend endless hours in coffee shops, allowing the caffeine to flow through my pen to form arrows, circles, and spider webs. As Han Hoffman says, “Design is the intermediary between information and understanding.”

Through my MBA research, I’ve  discovered design consulting firms that advocate ‘Design Thinking’ around innovation and business – that perfectly aligns with my creative soul:

  1. IDEO 
  2. DOBLIN 
  3. FROG DESIGN

From Doblin, I love their  Ten Types of Innovation framework – which provide a way to identify new opportunities beyond products and develop viable innovations.

Creative Confidence by IDEO founder and Stanford d.school creator David Kelley and his brother Tom Kelley is DEFINELY being added to my ‘need to read’ bookshelf!

 

Chocolate can bring back to life Audrey Hepburn! How morally acceptable is that?

Well, the digital revolution of character creation using digital computer software has finally been applied to television commercials. This Audrey Hepburn is life-like, organic, and beautifully lit. Visual Special Effects technology has come a long way since the awkward looking gaming characters that were not quite realistic enough. Initially, I like this ad because I’m a fan of Hepburn’s work.

Although there is something unsettling about bringing back Hepburn through digital technology. It seems that now more than ever before, people are loosing the ability to control their public image. How is it possible that a company can use Hepburn’s image to add to her persona without her written legal consent? I understand that celebrities are media constructs that are separate from the actual person, but nevertheless, it is the celebrities image that is at stake. I understand if it’s a fictional character based on a look-a-like, but this was intentioned to be Hepburn – her look, performance, aura, everything. If we can start bringing back celebrities from classical Hollywood, how will that change celebrity endorsements? And who will chose which advertisements the dead celebrities will star in? Will VFX threaten ‘the self’ image in today’s digital world?

Conclusion: Amazing, but unsettling

Yes, I’m slightly mad.

Yes, I'm slightly mad.

Yes, I am applying to work in advertising/marketing. Yes, I am a female. Yes, I want to be the big boss in the agency (A Donna Draper?). Yes, I love television, the cinema, and (basically) all types of media. Yes, I’ve seen the glamourous version of Mad Men. Yes, Yes, Yes.

Coca-Cola at the Movies.

Coca-Cola at the Movies.

Some key dates:

1. It’s generally accepted that cinema was invented around 1895 with the first film made for projection: Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory. In the beginning, it is silent and in black-in-white (the first Coca-Cola bottle).

2. The first feature-lenght sound film to be projected was The Jazz Singer in 1929. However, not all studios immediately transitioned and believed that this evolution to talkies is good for the art form of cinema. Nevertheless, sound becomes the industry standard by the 1932-33.

3. The transition to technicolor changed the film industry between 1922-1955. This artistic transition varied the use of colour vs. black-and-white. Examples of this time: His Girl Friday, The Wizard of Oz, Singin’ in the Rain (and the second Coca-Cola Bottle).

4. Hollywood started experimenting with 3D technology in the 1950s with Cinerama and 3D projectors. However, ultimately the technology was abandoned until it re-appeared in the mid-1980s with IMAX. According to the MPAA report of 2012, 41% of the screens in the US are equip for 3D projection, there were 36 3D films released in the US last year, and 48% of US viewers have watched at least one 3D movie in 2012That brings us to today (and the third Coca-Cola Bottle).

5. The Coca Cola Company was founded in 1886. So funnily enough, it’s history is about as long as cinema.

Oh how far we’ve come! Time to put on my 3D glasses…. or maybe we won’t need them in the future?