My favourite love stories – short and sweet.

 

This was part of a Search Stories Series  by Google. In just 52 seconds, they manage to tell the whole romance cycle of finding love during a Parisian study abroad. This video is closely followed by Pixar’s 4-minutes life story of Ellie and Carl in Up, beautifully accompanied by Michael Giacchino’s soundtrack:

In written form, my favorite love story is in Shakespeare’s Hamlet:

When I saw you I fell in love, and you smiled because you knew.

The IRON Lady doesn’t feel…she thinks.

My fellow film studies classmate – Gianluca Baroni – sent me this film clip as inspiration today. Thank you GL.

Watch your thoughts, for they become words. Watch your words, for they become actions. Watch your actions, for they become habits. Watch your habits, for they become your character. And watch your character, for it becomes your destiny. What we think, we become. My father always said that. And I think I am fine. 

Margaret Thacher (Character) Movie Quote

Chess, Courage, and Business.

The Unthinkable… and the Mundane. An article in Fast Company on business + Innovation. It’s DEFINITELY worth a read – takes just about 7.2398 minutes!

 But then the board became messy and complicated, and suddenly it was too late. I realised that I was losing because I didn’t have the daring to make a rudimentary move.

This is the beautiful tension that defines chess — that distinguishes between the unthinkable and the mundane. 

And for all my talk of boldness and daring, great chess players cannot lose sight of the mundane details. In business, you might call this blocking and tackling — the everyday operations that, if left untended, will undermine your organisation.

Written by: Garry Kasparov (#1 ranked chess player in the world)

The Lean Start-up

So I recently read The Lean Startup: How Constant Innovation Creates Radically Successful Businesses by Eric Ries.

the-lean-startup_50291668aa9bb

To caveat the ‘fail faster, learn faster’ mentality though – individuals should only start companies if they truly believe these businesses can create value for consumers and profitability for investors. Although there is a lot of seed money and angel investors at the moment looking to take advantage of the thriving start-up scene and promise of ‘unicorns’, I would remind people that most new businesses still fail or grow to a marginal level – therefore not returning on the initial investment.  ‘Doing A Start-up’ seems to have become an ambition or goal with the same emphasis and occurrence as ‘running a marathon’ or ‘living/studying in a foreign country’. However, owning your own business is not a tick-box off necessary millennial life experiences. It’s a lifestyle, career choice, and full commitment. So yes, Build, Measure, and Learn faster. But also be persistent, committed, and faithful to your start-up. If you plan on giving up easily, it wasn’t a business worth starting in the first place.

Eric also has a blog: http://www.startuplessonslearned.com 

 

New Medium: Ink + Water

Recently bought Water Brushes with Ink for my Monday Figure Drawing classes. Really struggling to control the weight of each stroke, but it’s great for thinking about volume and shadows.

Best piece of advice my high school figure drawing teacher gave me:

The fastest and easiest way to change your perspective and habitual drawing style is to switch mediums. So if you’re stuck or having a bad art day, don’t give up – just switch from a pen to a paint brush. 

The Tipping Point – of my love for Malcolm Gladwell

While doing some research on the diffusion of innovation for an upcoming talk – I refreshed my memory on the ideas in Gladwell’s book ‘The Tipping Point.’ 

If you haven’t read it… I would definitely recommend it, along with Blink and Outliers from Gladwell. (This is my second time telling you this – so hopefully increased frequency will get my point across).

“The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding. We are swimming in the former. We are desperately lacking in the latter.” – Blink

Success is the result of what sociologists like to call “accumulative advantage.” – Outliers

“That is the paradox of the epidemic: that in order to create one contagious movement, you often have to create many small movements first.” -Tipping Point

“When it comes to interpreting other people’s behavior, human beings invariably make the mistake of overestimating the importance of fundamental character traits and underestimating the importance of the situation and context.” -Tipping Point