Sunday mornings were made for Pumpkin Buttermilk Pancakes.

IMG_0129

Good Mornin’!

This fine Sunday morning, my flatmates and I made Pumpkin Buttermilk Pancakes. This deviates from my typical health-conscious food selection, but it was absolutely indulgently delicious. My inhibitions melted away as I watched the fluffy dough soak up the butter and maple syrup toppings. And the one thing that made it better was the french-pressed black coffee on the side and the breakfast chit-chat between flatmates. There was something so idyllic about watching the steam from my coffee mug, noticing the light gently come through our window, and listening to the calm of Shoreditch on a Sunday.

I may have said this before, but I’ll say it again… I absolutely love breakfast. It can be quite divided between people who adamantly believe in it and those that don’t bother eating in the morning. But for me, the act of waking up is so much more enjoyable when I look forward to not only food, but also the act of eating. Too many people consume, without actually eating. Especially at breakfast (when you’re on the go and already late for work), but you must not let the rush of life take away from the simple joy of food in the morning. 

While it’s true that a typical morning during the work week is quite different from a typical weekend morning, both can be relaxing and invigorating. During the week, I enjoy waking up before anyone else so as to soak up the empty spaces of the flat. And during the weekend, I enjoy waiting around the kitchen to have countertop conversations about the silliest and randomest of things. Either way, breakfast sets the tone for the rest of the day and thus, it should not be treated lightly. My advice to you: invest time and effort into breakfast… it could change your life. 

My flatmate found the instructions and ingredients on this BLOG…read the recipe here. You too can make some!

IMG_0121

“All happiness depends on a leisurely breakfast.” – John Gunther

“Breakfast is a peaceful moment for me, so I never have the radio on, no music, no noise around. The only noise that is permitted is people’s voices. It’s a way for me to wake up without too much of a high speed feeling. – Christian Louboutin

“I like to use ‘I Can’t Believe it’s Not Butter’ on my toast in the morning, because sometimes when I eat breakfast, I like to be incredulous. How was breakfast? Unbelievable.” – Demetri Martin

“Brunch, for me, is an extended breakfast that should be enjoyed whenever you have time properly to engage in cooking and eating.” – Yotam Ottelenghi

HOW TO make jam, compote, and memories in Bulgaria.

I spent this past week in Bulgaria. More precisely, I was in Sofia and a little town called Krichim visiting my grandparents, who are farmers. I absolutely love going to the countryside for the FOOD. Everything is locally grown, produced, created, and made… even down to the wine, vinegar, and jam. This time, I decided to write down and share my grandpa’s knowledge of jam making in my sketchbook.

plum

Here is the general process… and I’ve included pictures! Enjoy and please DO try this at home if you have the time, patience, and equipment.

Instructions for Making Jam

  1. Wash the fruit
  2. Cut the plums in half and take out the seed
  3. Place all the fruit in a bowl
  4. Mix according to these proportions:
    • 2 bowls of fruit
    • 1 bowl of sugar
  5. Leave the mixture to soak overnight
  6. The next day, boil the mixture while constantly stirring and removing any foam that forms
  7. Boil until the jam until it reaches the proper thickness/consistency… which should take about 30 minutes
  8. Before removing from the flame, add one teaspoon of lemon juice
  9. After the plum mixture has cooled down, distribute the jam into jars
  10. Close each jar using the pressurized cap machine.
  11. Boil the jars again for 5-7 minutes
  12. Let the jars cool down and then store them for the winter months!

Suburban Life in America as Depicted in Cinema is quite Dystopian.

Some Films to Watch: 

All that Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1955)

American Beauty (Sam Mendes, 1999)

Back To The Future (Robert Zemeckis, 1985)

The ‘Burbs (Joe Dante, 1989)

Far From Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002)

The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004)

The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967)

Happiness (Todd Solndz, 1998)

It’s a Wonderful Life (Frank Capra, 1946)

The Oranges (Julian Farino, 2011)

Pleasantville (Gary Ross, 1998)

The Stepford Wives (Bryan Forbes, 1975)

The Stepford Wives (Frank Oz, 2004)

The Truman Show (Peter Weir, 1998)

Some Academic Writing to Explain: 

“Hollywood’s anachronistic vision in this regard stands as testament to the profound cultural influence of the suburban landscape in the postwar years: for the development and subsequent massive expansion – particularly in the years and decades following the end of World War II – of ‘suburbia’ entailed the construction of not only a new kind of physical landscape, but new psychic and emotional landscapes as well.”

– Robert Beuka, “’Cue the Sun’: Soundings from Millennial Suburbia,” Iowa Journal of Culture Studies 3 (Fall 2003). Accessed Online. 

“Americans are obsessed with houses – their own and everyone else’s. We judge our selves and our neighbours by where and how we live.” 

– Dell Upton, Architecture in the United States (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1998), 14. 

“The city started out as the culprit. But by the postwar era, the suburbs had elbowed their way into that maligned position – the site of social dysfunction and pathology. Hell, it seemed, moved from the city to the suburbs – like everyone else.” 

– Becky Nicolaides, ‘ How Hell Moved from the City to the Suburbs’ in The New Suburban History, eds. Kevin Kruse and Thomas Sugrue, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006), 80. 

 

How do you feel about your white picket fence now?