Pantone’s ‘Solar Power’ Yellow and a bit of figure drawing.

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I’ve been putting my new Pantone book to good use with weekly figure drawing classes and random thoughts. The more I use it, the more I appreciate Pantone as a company and brand. Their standardisation of colours is essential for printed graphic design work. But the best part (as with lipstick and nail polish), is the different names of the colours… from ‘high-rise’ to ‘Snapdragon’ to ‘Fandango Pink.’ I think my new dream job is: CORPORATE COLOUR NAMER. 

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I updated the Figure Drawing Gallery on website: CLICK HERE. 

Also, now that I work in digital advertising, I’m going to place a tracking pixel on my website and track the Google Analytics. Let’s see who’s bopping about villyfriends.com!

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CHANEL No. 5 Film #theonethatiwant

I went to see The Imitation Game with Benedict Cumberbatch at the Empire cinema yesterday. As a media gal, I arrived early to watch the pre-roll adverts that are put on by Pearl & Dean (cinema advertiser).

My favourite was, but of course, the Chanel No. 5 Ad with the beautiful Gisele Bündchen. I love the marketing strategy of positioning Chanel No. 5 ads as ‘films’ and thus, correctly placing them on the big screen before a movie. The films, as with the brand, are always decedent, glamorous, and classy and they offer a beginning, middle, and end to the story. All I have to say is… these 3 minutes are filled with the perfect combination of sultry, yet elegant shots to create the perfect cinematography for the brand image of Chanel.

Some quotes by Mademoiselle Chanel: 

  • “Fashion passes, style remains.” 
  • “‘Where should one use perfume?’ a young woman asked. ‘Wherever one wants to be kissed,’ I said.”
  • “Dress shabbily and they remember the dress; dress impeccably and they remember the woman.”

An Adventurous Line + Free Figure Drawing Classes Info (London)

Happy Tuesday!

Firstly I thought I’d share a little video from the director/animator KAZUHIKO OKUSHITA:

It’s an animation using the simplicity of a red line to create contour figures and shapes. The film has excellent fluidity, movement, and visual design… it’s definitely one of my favourite independent short animations! It reminds me of one of my favourite quotes:

“A line is a dot that went for a walk.” – Paul Klee

Secondly, I went to a figure drawing class tonight at the Vintage Emporium and Tea Rooms (14 Bacon Street, London, E1 6LF). The nude figure drawing classes are free and held every Tuesday from 7 – 9 PM. Absolutely not my best work, but I’m slowly getting back into the techniques! Here are some examples to hopefully inspire you to go to your local life drawing classes:

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How to let loose: the 2 MINUTE Gesture.

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It’s been about 2 years since I’ve properly attended a life drawing/figure drawing class. But tonight I was rummaging around underneath my bed and I stumbled upon my old art pad. I thought I’d update my website and post a couple pictures to share the excitement and rush of warming up with gesture drawings before a life drawing class.

Gesture Drawings are quick sketches that usually last between 30 seconds and 3 minutes per pose. The goal of a gesture is to capture the ENERGY of the model’s pose and aim for general PROPORTIONS.

The examples above are 2 minute gesture drawings, used to loosen up before moving on to longer 30 – 60 minute postures. When people know they have AN HOUR to complete their drawing, they take their time, measure the proportions, and think before every stroke and shadow. With only 30 seconds for each posture, the careful uptight artist is forced to feel the drawing rather than calculate it. Even for long poses, you should start with a gesture in the beginning. Otherwise, the rest of your work is screwed… The proportions and energy must initially be correct before all the detail can transform a good sketch into an amazing piece of art.

Personally, I’ve always been fascinated with good sketches that are 10 minutes or less. It’s amazing how little detail and shading you actually need to recognise the human body and it’s posture. The University of London Student Union does some cheap classes on Wednesdays, so I definitely plan on starting back up soon!

Plus, it’s always hilarious to see people’s reaction when you tell them one of your hobbies is drawing naked people. (You can discover a lot about someone’s personality based on his or her attitude to the raw human body.) And that’s why I love art. It makes people feel awkward… pushing them outside their comfort zone.

Un peu “COMME UN BÂTEAU” (a bit of new french music)

Song by Indila. In her album Mini World.

Refrain: 

Un peu comme un bateau
J’avance face à la mer
Je navigue sur les flots
Un peu comme un bateau
J’avance et je suis fière
De ce que porte mon dos
Un peu comme un bateau
Qui trouve son équilibre
Entre les vagues et le chaos
Un peu comme un bateau
J’avance et je suis fière
De ce que porte mon dos
Un peu comme un bateau. 

Translation of the chorus: 

A bit like a boat
I’m pushing ahead against the sea
I’m sailing over the waves
A bit like a boat
I’m pushing ahead and I’m proud
of what I’m carrying on my back
A bit like a boat
which finds its balance
between waves and chaos
A bit like a boat
I’m pushing ahead and I’m proud
of what I’m carrying on my back
A bit like a boat

An extract from the introduction of my Film Studies Dissertation (King’s College London)…

This dissertation is situates within the growing research around the stylistic use of digital technology and new media in contemporary cinema. My main area of investigation will be the virtual camera in narrative computer-animated films, with a precise interest in musical cinematography. The term ‘musical’ refers to the narrative premise of analysing song or dance sequences, while the term ‘cinematography’ refers to the stylistic and aesthetic form of the camerawork. The musical context provides a point of consistency across the films and sequences chosen for formal analysis, thereby providing a lineage between different production methods and styles. Prince argues that that digital technology builds “on stylistic traditions established by filmmakers in earlier generations … while providing new and more powerful tools to accomplish these ends.”[1] Likewise this dissertation will explore the stylistic developments in computer-animated films in relation to past cinematic traditions.

This investigation is structured around the aim of outlining and testing the term ‘digital cine-mobility,’ as a cinematic style, through comparisons with established stylistic traditions. Chapter One will explore the visual effects of cel-animation and computer-animation in relation to the Walt Disney Animation Studio. Chapter Two will study the moving camera of the American film musical. And finally, Chapter Three will scrutinize the term ‘digital cine-mobility,’ which we will initially define as, the selection of fantastical, playful, and impossible camera movements in computer-animated films. The concept of digital cine-mobility is framed around a lively camera that presents spatially dynamic, effortlessly integrated, and kinetically expressive movements. The aim of this investigation is to progressively examine, and attempt to define, the descriptive terms above.

[1]  Stephen Prince, Digital Visual Effects in Cinema: The Seduction of Reality (New Brunswick, New Jersey, and London: Rutgers University Press, 2012), 4-5.