Creative Anatomy

 

Just went to a ‘Creative Anatomy’ Class yesterday from the London Drawing Society – the same place where I do my usual Monday life drawing classes. I majorly enjoyed looking beneath the outer layer and into the structural systems that shape the human body. I definitely make the mistake of drawing the shapes and lines I see in front of me rather than treating the body as a 3-dimensional mass. This was a great class and I can’t wait for the next regular Monday Life Drawing class to apply this to my art practice.

For me, life drawing is very similar to YOGA. By calling the process of joining the mind and body systems into one wholly integrated mind-body system a practice”, Yoga reiterates that perfection is relative and not a specific end-goal. It’s an ongoing journey that evolves as you do.

I also approach ‘Figure Drawing’ as a continuous practice rather than a means to an end. It’s a calming activity that feeds my creativity and curiosity. It’s constantly evolving depending on my present focus, mood, art materials, and environment. This anatomy class was a great addition to my practice to push me outside of my usual drawing approach. I find that if I stick with the same medium or model, I can easily enter an autopilot mindset. (but I guess that’s a general rule about going through life…)

If you put yourself in a position where you have to stretch outside your comfort zone, then you are forced to expand your consciousness.
– Les Brown

Am I able to give career advice? I’m only 22 after all.

I’ve been helping out at my old university – King’s College London – with their careers and employability office. A couple weeks ago, I went in to speak to current undergraduate and masters students at a career festival for the Film Studies program. After graduating in July, I now have 7 months of experience through my full-time job in a media agency. Walking down the all-too-familiar corridors created an interesting sensation:

Here I was in the exact same location and it’s very clear that it’s me who has changed and not the environment. In fact, the architecture, smell, feel, and people looked exactly the same as last year (when I was attending this career fair as a hopeful final year student). But this time, there was a different confident stride in my steps, not one of getting a first, but one of having job security figured out.

Most of the students were there looking for a way into the film industry. In that respect, I was their counter example of someone who veered away from the ‘artistic’ satisfaction of the creative arts for the more corporate world of marketing and advertising. I think speaking to the students was just as informative for me as it was for them. Nevertheless, I stood tall and explained my role and plans for the future in the business world.

Two weeks after the speaking event, the careers office asked me to write a blog post for them. And it finally came out, so I thought I’d share it (which was the point of my whole rant above). Enjoy:

http://blogs.thecareersgroup.co.uk/humanities/a-case-study-in-digital-advertising/

It offers some insights and advice to university students trying to figure out what they want to do after graduating by drawing on my own experiences of job hunting/soul searching.

I obviously still have so much to learn about the world of work: what skills are most employable, how to change jobs, how to progress, how to balance work/life, etc. However, I still feel that I can offer advice and help to university students, especially because the experience of transitioning lifestyles is still so fresh in my memories. It’s important for people to stay in touch with university students as they progress in their careers because, essentially, those students are the future of the work force. Their desires, mentality, and capabilities are a direct reflection of generational changes, economic situations, and cultural values. And it’s very hard to know what the future holds if you don’t understand the people that will be working it because let’s be honest, most business are people-led first and foremost. So an understanding of the younger work generation is ALWAYS key to any company that wants to grow.

In search of creativity… where is it found? #art #sketchbook #artwork #notes #creative

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Here are some of my artistic beliefs:

1. Creating rules, limitations, or specific projects can spark creative genius.

2. Fine art is not the only type of “ART.” A sketchbook should also contain notes, shopping lists, observations, and current worries.

3. An artist does not have ‘talent’ but the courage to try and the willingness to learn.

4. Art is a continual practice. And yes, you can lose it.

5. Create art for yourself, but aim to inspire others by boldly sharing your ideas and work.

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I have recently started a new blog. It will probably fail… but that’s not going to stop me from trying. In fact, I promise to dye my hair bright pink if I ever reach over 1,000 Twitter followers or 1,000 Facebook likes. [Not sure it would be easy with my dark brown lion’s mane…] But there it is. I said it.

So…. start liking, commenting, following, and retweeting. My hope is that my Naïsbook Project will inspire you to be more creative and call yourself an ‘artist.’ You can read about the purpose and name of the project HERE. Or like my Facebook page solely because you want one more pink haired person in this world, I would be alright with that as well.

WordPress: Naisbook Project

Facebook: Naïsbook Project

Twitter: @naisbookproject

Instagram: naisbookproject

Short Film: Naïsbook

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White Text on a Black Background.

White Text on a Black Background.

David Ogilvy HATES white text on a black background. I’m being serious… He states this fact at least 5 times in his book Ogilvy on Advertising. Statistics show that inverse text reduces readership. But I’m not trying to sell you anything, so hopefully this won’t upset the advertising gods out there. Please prove the legendary Ad Man wrong and read this quote because its content is well-written. 

It’s fun to break the rules sometimes, no?

Job Search… hire me?

Here are ten fun facts about me.

One, I drink way too much green tea.

Two and three, I compete in Ballroom and Latin Dance.

Four, I’ve never been to the South of France.

Five, at least 100 people have asked for my autograph

And Buster Keaton can always make me laugh.

Seven, I ran a marathon when I was thirteen.

Senior year, I was crowned the prom queen.

Nine, I use to be extremely shy

Ten, last year I went tanning in Dubai.

One of these is not really true,

I’ll tell which at the interview. 

5 ‘Petite’ Things About Paris

Exactly 5 months and 1 day ago I took the Eurostar from London to Paris, and naturally I voiced my enthusiasm on this blog. Well the time has come to journey back (quite literally… I am faced in the opposite direction of the train’s movement). So here are a couple things I’ve learned during my time in France:

1. As your proficiency skills in one language go up, your other languages will suffer. I would have never thought that becoming better at French would mean spelling and grammar mistakes in English, after all English is native language! But no, I was making silly typos almost every single day by the end of my stay. Bahhhhh, Alors, qu’est ce qu’on fait?

2. Quiche is one of the most delicious foods on the planet. Bahhhh….. Voilà.

3.  Being a nanny is a great way to socialize and learn about the country’s culture. You’d be surprised how much you can learn about the population by observing how children are raised. Bon… bahhh, on prend une goûte après l’école. Un petit Pomme-pot et une tartine avec Nutella pour toi aussi? 

4. They say bahhhhh….. a lot. The best way to learn a foreign language is to pick up the little sounds in between words. Believe me, it will do wonders for your accent. Je te promis.

5.  Living in Pars is HARD. And disheartening some times. You might get your phone stole. You will get whistled at and harassed. No matter how well you speak French, people will treat you like a foreigner. The metro will stop at random times. Your Internet will not work. You will live in small spaces. You will not have a gym near your apartment. Nothing will be open on Sunday and Monday and anything administration-related will never be open.  Don’t get me wrong; it’s a wonderful city. But to survive, you have to willing to struggle. To fight for what you want. Paris n’est pas la ville que tu as vue dans le film d’Amélie Poulin. Désolé.   

That being said, I would still recommend the experience to everyone. After all, the city does grow on you. You’ll crave a baguette as you walk down the cobblestone roads. Children will have the most adorable names. You will randomly decide to go the Musée d’Orsay on a Thursday night. And the French Countryside is absolutely lovely for a weekend escape.  

Bon… bahhh… voilà ! Une vite réflexion pendant que je prend le train à Londres. En gros, j’adore France et je suis impatiente d’améliorer mon français de plus. Peut-être c’est un peu difficile, mais avec les amies sympas ce serait une bonne expérience. 

“What do you wear to bed?”

1. A new commercial from Chanel no. 5 discussing Marilyn Monroe’s famous quote and the media  that follows the sex symbol, movie actress, and international star. My gosh, I am always impressed by her carefree persona.

2. This video is very visually pleasing and well edited – from the font choices to the classy white-and-black backgrounds. This ad displays archived footage, new images, text, recordings, and a voice-over. Almost imitating a documentary film style – an investigation into Marilyn’s legacy in the 50s. However, the fascination with Marilyn continues to elicit excitement and allure as this Channel ad demonstrates perfectly. Plus, for the high class image that Chanel No. 5 wants to promote, I believe this video serves its goal of glamour and appeal very well.

Oh la la, Marilyn’s star persona never get old: “I’ve never fooled anyone. I’ve let people fool themselves. They didn’t bother to find out who and what I was. Instead they would invent a character for me. I wouldn’t argue with them. They were obviously loving somebody I wasn’t.”