CHANEL No. 5 Film #theonethatiwant

I went to see The Imitation Game with Benedict Cumberbatch at the Empire cinema yesterday. As a media gal, I arrived early to watch the pre-roll adverts that are put on by Pearl & Dean (cinema advertiser).

My favourite was, but of course, the Chanel No. 5 Ad with the beautiful Gisele Bündchen. I love the marketing strategy of positioning Chanel No. 5 ads as ‘films’ and thus, correctly placing them on the big screen before a movie. The films, as with the brand, are always decedent, glamorous, and classy and they offer a beginning, middle, and end to the story. All I have to say is… these 3 minutes are filled with the perfect combination of sultry, yet elegant shots to create the perfect cinematography for the brand image of Chanel.

Some quotes by Mademoiselle Chanel: 

  • “Fashion passes, style remains.” 
  • “‘Where should one use perfume?’ a young woman asked. ‘Wherever one wants to be kissed,’ I said.”
  • “Dress shabbily and they remember the dress; dress impeccably and they remember the woman.”
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An Adventurous Line + Free Figure Drawing Classes Info (London)

Happy Tuesday!

Firstly I thought I’d share a little video from the director/animator KAZUHIKO OKUSHITA:

It’s an animation using the simplicity of a red line to create contour figures and shapes. The film has excellent fluidity, movement, and visual design… it’s definitely one of my favourite independent short animations! It reminds me of one of my favourite quotes:

“A line is a dot that went for a walk.” – Paul Klee

Secondly, I went to a figure drawing class tonight at the Vintage Emporium and Tea Rooms (14 Bacon Street, London, E1 6LF). The nude figure drawing classes are free and held every Tuesday from 7 – 9 PM. Absolutely not my best work, but I’m slowly getting back into the techniques! Here are some examples to hopefully inspire you to go to your local life drawing classes:

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Latest Shoreditch Discovery – SLATE coffee shop

This afternoon I re-visited Slate – probably one of the smallest coffee shops in East London.

The address: 96 Curtain Road, London EC2 
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The menu includes everything for a green power smoothies to salmon/avocado muffins… easy to see why I love this place! I had a flat white (which they call a flattie), but with coconut soy milk since today is one of my vegan-inspired days.
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My rating of Slate (1-5 scale):
Prices – 3 (a bit pricy – 2.80 for a latte – but absolutely delicious and the food is well priced)
Customer Service – 5 (the baristas behind the counter are absolutely lovely)
Wifi – YES
Ability to Work: 1 (there are only 8-10 small seats inside)
Charm: 4 (the decorations and graffiti on the wall provides a lovely shoreditch atmosphere)
Overall: 4 
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And my favourite thing about Slate is it’s genius business strategy with card payments. YES, there is a 5 pound card minimum. BUT, you can buy a coffee for yourself in advance to make the card minimum. So last weekend, I paid for 2 coffees… and got to drink one of them today! I think it’s a brilliant coffee shop model and the names on the wall also add to it’s cozy atmosphere.
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Some Allpress coffee and chilled time to brainstorm on Sunday? YES PLEASE.

What’s your definition of Home?

What's your definition of Home?

Let’s face it…. coffee shops are like a third home for me. I use the word ‘ home’ pretty liberally in terms of locations and countries. But after three years, I really do feel like London is my home. And no place more than The Fleet Street Press – a coffee shop near the Strand Campus of King’s College London and the Maughan Library on Chancery Lane. That coffee shop has seen multiple essays develop; it has kept so many secrets; it has fed me brownies and chickpea spinach soup. I even knew this coffee shop when it was called Get Coffee (Let’s go to ‘get coffee’ … clever right?) and the same Italian barista that has worked there for the past 3 years. A bleak Tuesday, three years ago, I saw this small coffee shop offering a ‘Monkey Mocha’. I was intrigued by the name and discovered a chocolate/banana/orange creation in this perfect house of wifi and bathroom access. Since that day, I have never looked back. It will always be one of my FAVOURITE coffee shops in London.

Check out their website: http://www.thefleetstreetpress.com

They also have a twitter with their daily clever coffee-board sayings!

CalArts and the Legendary Offsprings of room A113 are featured in Vanity Fair.

CalArts and the Legendary Offsprings of room A113 are featured in Vanity Fair.

Well, well, well… anyone who’s watched an animated film in the last 15 years has probably seen the result of this legendary class of Character Animation at CalArts (California Institute of the Arts). Most of PIXAR’s founding members were students of the classic Disney artists in the 70s and 80s. This Vanity Fair article is such a good summary and insight into the cultural climate and history of animation at the time – the lead up to the animation revival of the 1990s/2000s. It is definitely worth a read. (Just click on the photo to go to the article!!)

I get so inspired by this story (and this group of youngsters). But I think the lesson to take away from this is that you must be determined, hard-working, but also courageous to take risks and new opportunities. Today, there is no guarantee that graduating from CalArts will automatically lead you to become an animation director. These directors graduated at a different time in history and I believe that there will be a new wave of animation in the future. The question is, who is willing to create a new path and lead this revolution?

Independent Coffee Shops – visualised by the London Tube Map

Independent Coffee Shops - visualised by the London Tube Map

Well, besides the fact that the TFL is having disruptions due to the London Tube Strike… this is a lovely graphic that showcases all the best independent coffee shops. For those that feel a little bit more spicy than a Costa, Nero, or Starbucks. There’s something about the independents that is fabulous. The inconsistent tables, the local waiters, and the foam hearts on your coffee. I’ve been to at least 10 of these coffee shops, but my all around favourite is The Oval Lounge… Why you might ask? Because I lived around the corner from the cafe on Palfrey Place. That independent coffee shop has sentimental value: I would pass it on my way to school, my flatmates and I would have sunday brunch, and they had Eggs Florentine for a Tuesday afternoon work session on one of their wooden tables.

It’s create to explore the city and look for coffee shops, but ultimately, it’s the ones nearest to you that make the biggest impact. They have convenience, consistency, sentimental value, and a “this is mine” feeling. Those small coffee shops that only fit the locals may not be a part of multi-national corporations that are changing the global business landscape, but the small ones change my Sundays and Tuesdays. Make no mistake, the local business make a BIG difference in people’s day to day life. And I for one, thank them… especially for the foam hearts.

Chocolate can bring back to life Audrey Hepburn! How morally acceptable is that?

Well, the digital revolution of character creation using digital computer software has finally been applied to television commercials. This Audrey Hepburn is life-like, organic, and beautifully lit. Visual Special Effects technology has come a long way since the awkward looking gaming characters that were not quite realistic enough. Initially, I like this ad because I’m a fan of Hepburn’s work.

Although there is something unsettling about bringing back Hepburn through digital technology. It seems that now more than ever before, people are loosing the ability to control their public image. How is it possible that a company can use Hepburn’s image to add to her persona without her written legal consent? I understand that celebrities are media constructs that are separate from the actual person, but nevertheless, it is the celebrities image that is at stake. I understand if it’s a fictional character based on a look-a-like, but this was intentioned to be Hepburn – her look, performance, aura, everything. If we can start bringing back celebrities from classical Hollywood, how will that change celebrity endorsements? And who will chose which advertisements the dead celebrities will star in? Will VFX threaten ‘the self’ image in today’s digital world?

Conclusion: Amazing, but unsettling