Designing LIFE according to architects Ted Mosby and Frank Gehry.

Designing LIFE according to architects Ted Mosby and Frank Gehry.

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER QUOTES

“There are a lot of little reasons why the big things in our lives happen.”
– Ted, Season 4, Episode 22

“Look, you can’t design your life like a building. It doesn’t work that way. You just have to live it… and it’ll design itself.”
– Lily, Season 4, Episode 24

THE BUILDING AND ARCHITECT

The image shows one of my favourite architectural structures of the modern era. It’s Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. (Built 1997)

“The recent work of Frank Gehry epitomises both the folding and complexity theories without explicitly being based on either. Gehry is aware of the writings on both and respects them, but he is led more by his intuitive concerns. Nevertheless, his new Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao characterises the supple, pliant, moving qualities of the one and the notions of self-organising systems and the fractal order of the other.”

Charles Jenks, “Post-Modernism and the Revenge of the Book,” in This is Not Architecture, eds. Kester Rattenbury (London and New York: Routledge, 2002), 191.

Gehry on design teams for architecture: “I collaborate with people on projects because it enriches the mix and gets you somewhere else that you wouldn’t have gotten to otherwise. When it’s really working, it is like holding hands and jumping off a cliff together.”

Barbara Isenberg and Frank Gehry, Conversations with Frank Gehry (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2009), 155.

If you’re interested in Frank Gehry, I would recommend the documentary: Sketches of Frank Gehry (Sydney Pollack, 2006). It’s less than 90 minutes long and provides personal interviews with the architect about his career, creative process, and opinion on life.

Suburban Life in America as Depicted in Cinema is quite Dystopian.

Some Films to Watch: 

All that Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1955)

American Beauty (Sam Mendes, 1999)

Back To The Future (Robert Zemeckis, 1985)

The ‘Burbs (Joe Dante, 1989)

Far From Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002)

The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004)

The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967)

Happiness (Todd Solndz, 1998)

It’s a Wonderful Life (Frank Capra, 1946)

The Oranges (Julian Farino, 2011)

Pleasantville (Gary Ross, 1998)

The Stepford Wives (Bryan Forbes, 1975)

The Stepford Wives (Frank Oz, 2004)

The Truman Show (Peter Weir, 1998)

Some Academic Writing to Explain: 

“Hollywood’s anachronistic vision in this regard stands as testament to the profound cultural influence of the suburban landscape in the postwar years: for the development and subsequent massive expansion – particularly in the years and decades following the end of World War II – of ‘suburbia’ entailed the construction of not only a new kind of physical landscape, but new psychic and emotional landscapes as well.”

– Robert Beuka, “’Cue the Sun’: Soundings from Millennial Suburbia,” Iowa Journal of Culture Studies 3 (Fall 2003). Accessed Online. 

“Americans are obsessed with houses – their own and everyone else’s. We judge our selves and our neighbours by where and how we live.” 

– Dell Upton, Architecture in the United States (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1998), 14. 

“The city started out as the culprit. But by the postwar era, the suburbs had elbowed their way into that maligned position – the site of social dysfunction and pathology. Hell, it seemed, moved from the city to the suburbs – like everyone else.” 

– Becky Nicolaides, ‘ How Hell Moved from the City to the Suburbs’ in The New Suburban History, eds. Kevin Kruse and Thomas Sugrue, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006), 80. 

 

How do you feel about your white picket fence now?