Transparent accessories are in FASHION.

You may have seen these invisible innocent little hair ties   taking the world by storm:

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I couldn’t resist jumping on the bandwagon. They’re great for putting your hair up without crumpling the hair strands and creating crease lines. Although they can stretch out, they magically regain their tight shape! I’m a big fan. (Though I fear it will be one of those short-lived fashion statements that I will have to explain to my children as they doubt my coolness as a 20-year old…)

Anyone who reads this blog will know by know… I love watches. So, with this clear/transparent trend going on in hair fashion, I looked for watches that were following a similar aesthetic. SWATCH was the main leader in transparent, fun time-telling accessories. At Stansted airport on my way from London to Ljubljana, I bought this lovely little watch: Thin Liner. I love the sleek thickness of the watch face as well as the fun colour choices. It’s definitely a statement of me not wanting to enter the later half of my 20s….

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Here I am in Ljubljana wearing both clear accessories:

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Hair ties and watches aside, Slovenia is one of my new favourite places in the world. (As in, I want to start learning Slovenian so I can move there…luckily the language is very similar to Bulgarian in pronunciation, it just uses Latin characters rather than Cyrillic). The nature, people, architecture, and city were all breathtaking, humble, and comforting.  Watch this space… but I reckon by 30, I’ll be wearing my Swatch and Invisibobble in Slovenia! #maybe #languagelearning #centraleurope

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Updated Figure Drawings on my website.

The flowers are blossoming in London and that can only mean one thing: SPRING. And with the change in season comes Spring Cleaning of my apartment. It’s officially time to store away 2-3 sketchbooks and throw away stacks of loose paper. The more I draw, the less attached I get to any one drawing. When I was in high school, I used to get protective over every painting, drawing, and doodle. But I’ve started thinking about my art as an ongoing journey and form of creative meditation rather than a portfolio (required for college applications or job interviews). This mentality has completely changed my approach to figure drawing… and my willingness to stuff A3 sketchbooks into the trash.

How would you change your approach to something you love if it was for purely personal fulfillment rather than professional development? 

Most people believe in the ‘Do what you love’ mantra about work, but I think it’s hard to receive personal fulfillment if you’re being paid to create work/art for someone else. To me, there are things I love doing at work and things I love doing in my personal life. Equally satisfying, but in separate ways.

If you want to see my favorite figure drawings, I’ve uploaded them to my website (obviously I created digital evidence of my work before throwing them in the bin!) Check them out here.

 

Creative Anatomy

 

Just went to a ‘Creative Anatomy’ Class yesterday from the London Drawing Society – the same place where I do my usual Monday life drawing classes. I majorly enjoyed looking beneath the outer layer and into the structural systems that shape the human body. I definitely make the mistake of drawing the shapes and lines I see in front of me rather than treating the body as a 3-dimensional mass. This was a great class and I can’t wait for the next regular Monday Life Drawing class to apply this to my art practice.

For me, life drawing is very similar to YOGA. By calling the process of joining the mind and body systems into one wholly integrated mind-body system a practice”, Yoga reiterates that perfection is relative and not a specific end-goal. It’s an ongoing journey that evolves as you do.

I also approach ‘Figure Drawing’ as a continuous practice rather than a means to an end. It’s a calming activity that feeds my creativity and curiosity. It’s constantly evolving depending on my present focus, mood, art materials, and environment. This anatomy class was a great addition to my practice to push me outside of my usual drawing approach. I find that if I stick with the same medium or model, I can easily enter an autopilot mindset. (but I guess that’s a general rule about going through life…)

If you put yourself in a position where you have to stretch outside your comfort zone, then you are forced to expand your consciousness.
– Les Brown